Loading Events

« All Events

Naming Louisville’s Largest Parks: Tribes, Politics, and the Filson President

Tuesday, June 11, 2019: 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Venue: The Filson Historical Society

Add To Calendar   11/06/2019 18:00:00 11/06/2019 19:00:00 America/Anguilla Naming Louisville’s Largest Parks: Tribes, Politics, and the Filson President Tuesday, June 11, 6:00-7:00 p.m. | Dr. Richard Hume Werking will discuss the early history of Louisville's park system, including how the city's three largest parks got the names they still have today. The Filson Historical Society, 1310 South 3rd Street, Louisville, Kentucky, 40208 The Filson Historical Society info@filsonhistorical.org false DD/MM/YYYY


SectionPriceService FeeTickets Requested
272357102597 Filson members $0.00 $0.00
select
272358102597 Non-members $10.00 $1.58
select
Add To Cart

Who named Cherokee, Iroquois, and Shawnee Parks?  When and how?  And why these names?

Louisville’s public parks are among the city’s most important assets.  Yet relatively few Louisville residents are acquainted with the early history of our park system, including how our three largest parks got the names they still have today -- 128 years later.

Some have speculated that it was Frederick Law Olmsted himself -- the prominent landscape architect who contributed so much to the park system’s design and subsequent reputation -- who named Cherokee, Iroquois, and Shawnee parks.  But the archives tell a different story.  As usual, the history surrounding this subject is much richer and more complex than it might initially seem.   

Dr. Richard Hume Werking, Library Director and Professor of History Emeritus at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, grew up in Evansville, Indiana.  A graduate of the Universities of Evansville, Wisconsin, and Chicago, he is the author of The Master Architects:  Building the United States Foreign Service, 1890-1913.  Among his other publications are biographical essays on Admiral Raymond A. Spruance and General Walter Bedell Smith in Indiana’s 200: The People Who Shaped the Hoosier State.  


Naming Louisville’s Largest Parks: Tribes, Politics, and the Filson President

It looks like your cookies have disabled on your browser, this store requires cookies, please adjust your browser's settings to enable cookies to continue.